Posts Tagged "toddlers"

Retrieved from the post office today…

Posted on May 1, 2014 | 0 comments

Retrieved from the post office today…

Retrieved from the post office today: one package too large for the slot in my door addressed to May. A late birthday gift? No. Six nappies. May turned five a week ago. That is one year since she was eligible for free nappies (AKA diapers for my American friends). A year of nappies we have purchased for May, at our expense – and in return, SIX. Children in the UK who cannot be potty trained receive free nappies on the NHS once they turn four. And so, I find myself with six nappies. For the past year, I’ve been begging for… six nappies. I should add the package, which I thought was a gift – and I suppose many people would be grateful to receive as a gift (hello again, my American friends) – was picked up today, but arrived a week ago and we’ve had none since. At my conservative calculations (5 x nappies/day for a year = 1,780 nappies) the government owes us approximately: £350 ($600). Which is no small amount. Not to mention we have no idea when we will receive more. Are we meant to reuse these disposable nappies? I’m just...

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Should you have another baby?

Posted on Feb 9, 2014 | 1 comment

Should you have another baby?

Last week on BabyCenter, I mused over whether parents should have another child – and specifically I was thinking of parents of children with special needs, but it could be anyone who just loves babies and is an enormous sap. Should you have another baby? Here’s the answer: Three years ago, I felt like an absolute lunatic when I reluctantly admitted to my husband what’d I’d been mulling over for the past six months. “Sometimes,” I said, “I think about having another baby.” “I’d have another baby with you,” he returned with a half-cocked smile. Almost a dare. That we would have this conversation at all was a miracle. Our first pregnancy ended tragically. 68 hours of labor for me. A window in time when he thought I was dying. A baby that suffered a severe brain injury and still can not walk or communicate today; she never will. So, why would we smile at one another and press forward? Were we really so blind? So stupid? So in love? Erm, yes. I worried about money, space, time – even my aching back. I wondered if I’d hate endless baby tears, 3 AM visits and reading that same story over and over again. But I never regretted it and I would like to think you won’t either. Another BabyCenter blogger, Melissa Willets, wondered this week whether she should have a fourth baby.  If I could go back in time and reassure myself that I wasn’t a lunatic and that another baby was the best decision of my life, I would. But, I can’t. So I’ll just encourage you and Melissa instead… Click through to read all the reasons – each one sappier than the next. And if that’s not enough to convince you… how about these photos of May and Ieuan over the past few years?  If I’m not mistaken, I think they love each other. (Click to see in full): My two favorite travel companions. Young love? My biggest fans. And yes, my voice merits this level of adoration. And if that’s not enough to convince you… try this post I wrote called: If you ever doubted having another child. I’m just trying to populate the world with cuties – one post at a...

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Goodbye 2013…

Posted on Dec 28, 2013 | 12 comments

Goodbye 2013…

Congratulations to May and I ! This is our 400th post on Mama Lewis. Thanks for reading and happy holidays! To say I’m done with 2013 is an understatement. If someone offered me a lobotomy tomorrow and said, “We can remove 2013, but we’d have to remove everything, not just from about April when May’s hips began to really trouble her. You’d have to erase everything. May’s birthday at Kew Gardens. Your fun day at the London Zoo. Everything.” I’d say, “How soon can you cut me open?” Many people like to look at the positive side to life’s catastrophes. I’m not one of them. I’d like to forget life’s catastrophes. Despite my attitude I have taken a few positives from this year: 1) Having May prepared me for cancer. It wasn’t nearly as life changing as it would have been. (Which is either really depressing or really positive depending on how you look at it.) 2) Distance away from May has made it more obvious how she’s improved this year post-surgery. She is far happier, livelier and more responsive. For one, her head control has improved enormously. We sat her in a high chair this week that she hasn’t used in eight months and we didn’t have to angle the back of the chair to feed her. We always had to lower it before. 3) I spend a lot more time with my kids and my husband. I’m not in work, for one. It’s kinda like maternity leave all over again, but this time I nap instead of the baby. Also, I’ve cut down on my writing. Which is why you don’t hear so much from me here anymore. Sorry. I’ve prioritized life. It happens. Here’s what I’d like from 2014: Nothing. I want it to be the dullest, most uneventful year ever. Love, laugh, bounce – the May motto. That’s all I...

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My two-year old knows something’s wrong with May

Posted on Nov 25, 2013 | 5 comments

My two-year old knows something’s wrong with May

A few mornings ago, my husband was taking a shower and so didn’t hear May have a seizure. She cries in a thin and tremulous voice, and it is filled with terror. She still has at least one seizure like this a day, which is much better than it used to be. My husband was letting me sleep in, so I didn’t hear it either. Very softly, there was a knock at my door. “Mama?” a little voice said. “May-May’s crying.” I rushed out and held her in time to comfort her. Later that morning, Ieuan made himself shake. Just like May, his arms went rigid and his fingers wide. He made a crying, tremulous sound. He stopped, then started again. “You don’t need to do that, honey,” I said gathering him to me. “You are fine. May gets upset like that, but you don’t have to.” Ieuan knows something is wrong with May. He wants to comfort her. He brings her toys, her bottle and other things he knows she likes – but May can’t hold them or use them without assistance. The other day I found him in the living room feeding her a bottle as she sat in her chair. I find this both sweet and unsettling. He is old enough to know something is up, but not old enough to make sense of it. That will come though. We will walk a fine line throughout his childhood of allowing him to care about her and not asking him to take care of her. I used to think I wouldn’t have him help at all, to preserve his childhood. But he loves May, and I don’t think he can help but want to take...

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Kids All Access… Hampton Court Palace

Posted on Sep 12, 2013 | 3 comments

Kids All Access… Hampton Court Palace

As if our children don’t already feel like royalty, why not treat them like it! And, so it was that I celebrated my 40th birthday properly. Not rushed in a quick meal down the road. Not rushed with a toast over dinner sitting in front of the television. I took myself and my family and friends and stayed in a palace, Hampton Court Palace, for the weekend. Children pick up on the atmosphere of their parents. May, too. She has a long history of sensing negative situations. I worried that the kids wouldn’t enjoy it, because after all – despite what I said above, I would struggle to put them down if they became distressed. I certainly could not guarantee that May or Ieuan would appreciate the historical significance of Henry the VIII’s palace. But, I hoped they might like at least like the garden attached to the house. And, they did! May delighted at the cobblestone and pebbled paths throughout the palace. She loved the vibrations of her buggy juttering over stones. I could never have predicted that. Sensory experiences included ingredients in the King’s kitchen to hold and sniff, and beautiful walks through the expansive gardens. May’s wheelchair could even access the famous garden hedge maze. And, Ieuan loved the house with its many doors and trying to out run us to the grand staircase that was just perfect for climbing. It was baby paradise. More importantly – and it was – we enjoyed it. We deserved it. Selfishness is gooooood. Despite Hampton Court Palace being built by Henry the VIII access is completely modernised for disabled princesses and princes. We were personally escorted around the Palace, behind roped off areas and into lifts that allowed us to reach all the rooms on the higher levels of the Palace. The eateries and toilets also have level access. Click on the photos to see the Georgian House where we stayed!   For more information on disabled access to the Hampton Court Palace see their web site for disabled access information. And, if you want to stay for a week or the weekend in the Georgian House on the grounds of Hampton Court Palace, like we did, visit the web site for the Landmark Trust who run the property. Be warned, the property itself is not accessible. We had to lift May up and down stairs, a minor inconvenience for us but probably not so minor if she was five years older! Kids all access… London is an on-going series on Mama Lewis to encourage special needs families to explore London. If you want May to review your attraction or know of one she should definitely see, please comment below or...

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